Meet The Ensemble: Scott Horvik

Photo by Dan Francis Photography.
Photo by Dan Francis Photography.

A quick Google search can tell you about the accomplishments and eclectic talents of Scott Horvik. You’ll learn that he is a founding member of Theatre B and is a local voice talent. However, it won’t tell you about the time he broke his neck or what his dream role is, keep reading to find out. You can see Scott onstage now, playing Terry McShane in Slice of Life.

TB: How does theatre inspire you?

SH: To me I think one of the biggest things is empathy. Being able to relate to a character either that you create or that you see on stage. It allows you to get in their shoes and see what their life is like. 

TB: What draws you to a role?

SH: If it just speaks to me. One of the roles I loved playing at B was the role of the Fire Chief in The Guys. The story was beautiful, the empathy that you felt for the fire captain was wonderful, and that was a fascinating look at the tragedy of 9/11 from the standpoint of the fire fighters. Of the people who without thought and concern go in to save you. So I loved doing that.

TB: How many productions have you been involved in at Theatre B?

SH: Oh jeez, I’d have to go through posters. Probably 20-25.

Carolyn Wintersteen (L) Scott Horvik (R) in 'The Guys'.
Carolyn Wintersteen (L) Scott Horvik (R) in ‘The Guys’.

TB: So is your involvement with Theatre B your artistic and creative outlet?

SH: Yeah I think so! Well I think that the goal of doing this was so that there would be. I like plays; I’m not a musical guy. I like small plays, so Theatre B is totally right up my ally. How we started this was just to do plays that weren’t necessarily done at the time that would be a little edgier, that may offend people. So yes, it actually has been a way for me to do that. It’s been an amazing ride.

TB: Do you have a dream role?

SH: Boy, No, cant say that I do…. OH! I take that back! I would love to play George in Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf. That would be awesome. That would be a dream role.

TB: Why is that?

SH: I remember reading Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf in college. It was freshman year and it was the first time we really got to read something, and it was like, “Holy shit! We get to read this stuff?! This is crazy! What kind of weird ideas are you throwing at me?” And I remember reading this and thinking “OMG. This is awesome!” I remember doing a monologue of George’s from the piece, which I totally wasn’t age appropriate at the time, but those characters are just so great. It would be awesome to do Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf. Or The Goat. That would be another great show to do. George though, that would be a great role.

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Lori Horvik & Scott Horvik in ‘Dinner with Friends’.

TB: So you were pretty young then. Do you have any tips you’d like to give your 17 year-old self? Or even back when you first tasted theatre?

SH: Wow. Good question. I would just trust your instincts. And don’t stop learning; I have to give myself that advice even now.

TB: What did you want to be when you were young?

SH: A pilot.

TB: Do you have a fun fact people may not know about you?

SH: I broke my neck when I was a senior in high school.

TB: Ow! How’d you do that?

SH: Pole-vaulting. Missed the mat, landed on my head. Which is one of the reasons why I didn’t go into the Air Force and I took an Acting class for shits and giggles.

TB: Well, it worked out huh?

SH: Yeah. Probably every job I’ve had since college has been as a direct or indirect result of theatre. My current job I have because I know my boss from doing theatre. The job I had before this, I knew my boss from theatre. The first job I had in radio I got because I knew a guy from theatre. I did radio production because I knew a guy from theatre.

From left to right: David Wintersteen, Lori Horvik, Shott Horvik, and Carolyn Wintersteen in 'Vino Veritas'.
From left to right: David Wintersteen, Lori Horvik, Scott Horvik, and Carolyn Wintersteen in ‘Vino Veritas’. Photo by Michael Benedict.

TB: What do you love most about being part of the ensemble?

SH: I like the family atmosphere. I like that we trust each other and we work well together to create a quality product and tell a good story.

TB: What does that family mean to you?

SH: I love the fact that we trust each other. There’s a core group that works together. A number of us have worked together for a long time, but we’re not afraid to have new people come in or to try new things. There’s a familiarity, a common language, an institutional memory that goes along with what the ensemble is, and as people come in or travel out of the ensemble, that institutional memory stays alive.

There are things that the entire ensemble works to articulate, like Theatre B’s mission, vision and values. I think the ensemble understands these things innately, and we discuss them periodically to make sure that we are all still traveling in the same direction. The fact that we continue to evaluate and communicate as an ensemble helps insure that the productions are focused and have the Theatre B flavor.

 

Interviewer: Corin Puhalla, Theatre B Promotions Intern

 

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